HOW TO VIEW

How to view 3D Stereoscopic Images and Anaglyphs

Below: An example of a pair of stereoscopic pictures for cross eyed viewing

Stereoscopic Picture of Happy Meal being eaten at McDonalds (Right Image)
Stereoscopic Picture of Happy Meal being eaten at McDonalds (Left Image)

Happy Meal at McDonalds. (Right Image)

Happy Meal at McDonalds. (Left Image)

 

 

Depth Charge 3D photo gallery

Select 3D Photo Gallery from the navigation menu above to view thumbnails of the photos. Click on any one of these thumbnail pictures to open the 3D Viewer Applet. The viewer automatically opens the pictures in "Cross Eyed" viewing mode. You can select many different viewing methods and modes from the 3D Viewer Applet. Each method of viewing is explained below. Whilst viewing the 3D pictures in the applet you can press [H] key to display Help information. To display the images at 100% size press the [J] key or to display the images as a slide show press the [SS] button.

arrow keys

Top Tip!

Whilst viewing the image/s in 3D anaglyph mode with red/green or red/blue glasses use your arrow keys to adjust the parallax (distance apart of the overlapping images) for perfect viewing.

Select Stereo viewing method

 

 

 

Cross-Eyed (Freeviewing)

You can try this on the examples above. Cross your eyes slightly whilst looking at the images. You'll see a 3rd image appear in the middle (in your minds eye). At first it's a fuzzy image and not the same size as the other two. Keeping your eyes crossed, gently move toward or away from the screen until this 3rd middle image is approximately the same size as the other two images. Keeping your eyes crossed the whole time, relax and try to focus on this image. Slowly it comes into focus, in color and in amazing 3D!

This technique requires a little practice, but in time you'll find you can easily switch from 2d viewing to cross-eyed 3d viewing with little or no effort.

 

 

Parallel-Eyed (Freeviewing)

Parallel viewing requires you to use your left eye to look at the left image and your right eye to look at the right image, you look at the screen so that your eyes are parallel. As you continue to gaze at the images you'll get a double vision as each eye sees each image. As with cross-eyed viewing moving gently towards or away from the screen will bring these double images together in your minds eye. This middle image will then be magically in 3D! As with the first method described you will still see the outer images (two original photographs) in your peripheral vision and you'll see they remain in 2D. Most people have a preference be it parallel-eyed or cross-eyed freeviewing.

 

 

Free viewing

Both cross-eyed and parallel-eyed viewing techniques are sometimes referred to as "Free viewing" because they are without the aid of any optical viewing equipment or glasses and rely solely on the ability of the human eye to adjust its focus point and the brains' ability to interpret the images and fuse them together.

Actually it all gets quite interesting when you realize our eyes see nothing and it's our brains that see everything!

Navaching's web site can be used to exercise and train your eyes in parallel and cross-eyed viewing whilst also giving you some small insight into what's going on. Take a look at their Stereoscopic Mandalas page.

 

 

Above/Below (Glasses required)

Shutter glasses are needed for this type of viewing. It's more common application is for viewing 3D videos. The glasses are synchronised to the video output to open and shut at the correct times to produce the 3D effect without flicker. You'd require LC Shutter Glasses which can support "Sync-Doubling" to view "Above/Below" 3D videos and photographs.

 

 

Red/Cyan Red/Blue Red/Green (Glasses required)

The left and right images are combined into one image. The colours for each picture are adjusted depending on which type of 3d glasses are going to be used or to take into account if the image is to be viewed on a printed page or monitor screen.

The common variations of 3D glasses are Red/Cyan, Red/Blue and Red/Green meaning the lenses are of those colours and only let that particular colour light through to your eyes.

The resulting images appear a kind of Black & White because not all of the colour spectrum is being let through the glasses or even delivered by the composite image. As with Black & White photography, this can lend a gravitas and focus on form, composition and more importantly texture. I think they can be quite beautiful in their own right!

Advantages: Don't have to cross or defocus your eyes or try to perform parallel viewing and the glasses are inexpensive.

 

 

color Anaglyphs (Glasses required)

As above the colour channels are adjusted. Adjusting the red channel for one image and the blue channel for the other image then both images are combined. But this time all the other colors are also adjusted to try to re-create the original colors when viewed through the red/blue anaglyph glasses. Red/blue is the most common variant but as above the anaglyphs can be split in other color combinations.

Advantages: Don't have to cross or defocus your eyes or try to perform parallel viewing and the glasses are inexpensive.

 

 

Half color (Glasses required)

Adjusting the red channel for one image and the blue channel for the other image then both images are combined. All the other colors are also adjusted to try to re-create something close to the original colors when viewed through the red/blue anaglyph glasses. Their saturation is then reduced by about half, this helps to give a smoother viewing experience where there might be awkward colors in the scene. Colors that don't filter well through one or other of the color filters in your glasses.

Advantages: It's personal preference and may work well for a particular scene where there may be colors that don't react well to being viewed through the different color filters.

 

 

Interlaced (Active Shutter Glasses required)

Interlacing is probably the easiest method and is what is used in (PAL and NTSC) 3D video systems (i.e. field-sequential DVDs and VHS video tapes available from various suppliers).

A single image with the left and right views interlaced on alternating lines. The odd numbered lines in the image are from the left view, and the even numbered lines are from the right view.

The image is constructed of odd lines from the right perspective and even lines from the left perspective, the interlaced nature of the display will mean that at first a right image will be displayed and then the left image will be displayed (left and right images will be alternately displayed - time or field-sequentially). When viewed through LC shutter glasses synchronised with the field rate, each eye will see a different image.

 

 

Ref. True3d

Andrew Woods 3d

 

 

 

Vertical Interlaced (Active Shutter Glasses required)

Interlacing is probably the easiest method and is what is used in (PAL and NTSC) 3D video systems.

Vertical interlacing seems to be a lot less popular than horizontal interlaced but the principles remain the same. See above.

 

 

Single Image (Not 3D)

Displays the single LEFT image. You can toggle between the left and right image. [L] [R]

 

 

The magic of 3d!

Webmaster depthcharge3d.com

I've been interested in 3D photography for many years and hope to convey some of the magic to you. I'd be very interested to hear your opinions. I hope you enjoy the site! Please leave messages and contact me on my 3D blog/forum.

I've only just set up the 3D Photography Forum so please join in the discussions there or add your own posts and help make it a vibrant useful resource. Click 3D Blog/Forum

 

Depth Charge Stereoscopic 3D Photography

 

Depth Charge 3D Photography